Wels CampusEngineering

Master's ThesesBest of

Communication Concept for Operation of Smart Grid Demonstratorby Moreno Muñoz Andres Leonardo, 2016

Summary

Upcoming smart grids will require a bi-directional flow of electricity and information to provide an automated and distributed energy delivery network. The pursued main outcome of this thesis is the implementation and development of the necessary communication technologies for operating a smart grid demonstrator. This demonstrator focuses in the optimization of consumption in households by using flexible loads. The communication is done between existing devices such as smart meter and local intelligence.

Digital version here

 

 

Software Models for Operating a Smart Grid Demonstrator with Respect to Load Optimizationby Hamad Khalil, 2016

Summary

The aim of this thesis is to investigate the potential of active load management in households and to develop software models for operating a smart grid demonstrator. This is done by developing control algorithms to achieve load shifting with the use of realistic load profiles. The control algorithm is based on a traffic light model approach used for a very efficient communication of grid information and needs.

Digital version here

 

Advanced solar desalinisation for tourism industry in Cyprusby Chandwankar Roshan Ramesh, 2016

Summary

The thesis presents the solution of an improved Multiple Effect Distillation (MED) model using innovative of sea water preheating for the production of fresh water. With a variation in the water demand and sea water temperatures throughout the year, a desalination plant model is developed according to the summer as well as winter mode. The benefit of the solution would be, simultaneous production of steam and electricity from the same system. The study features plant design and performance data ensuring low specific electricity consumption for the tourism industry in Cyprus. An additional task would be to supply the necessary energy demand from a renewable energy source which can be a clean and sustainable option.

Digital version here

 

Simulation based analysis of control strategies for heat pump integration in district heating networksby Takle Ankit, 2017

Summary

The thesis has been conducted along with the Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH within the framework of the projects IEA (International Energy Agency) EBC Annex 60, which deals with new generation computational tools for building and community energy systems and IEA HPP Annex 47, dealing with heat pumps in district heating and cooling. This thesis provides an insight into the thermo-economic possibilities of integrating large scale heat pumps in Austrian district heating networks with the help of two control strategies, Dynamic Pricing and Demand Side Management. The former utilizes the variable prices in the wholesale electricity market whereas the later applies the concept of heat load management along with the variable prices.

Mr Takle's thesis was presented at the 4th Generation District Heating Conference 2017 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

With his thesis he has also won the "European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE)" student award 2018. Congratulations! (Check the video here)

Digital version here

 

Case studies on an integral, simulation-based energy-efficient open loop control for daylight and artificial lightingby Alam Kazi, 2016

Summary

Daylight and thermal boundary conditions are essential benchmarks for a pleasant sense of space. A comfortable indoor built environment can ensure maximum efficiency and satisfaction of occupants. Therefore, a predictive daylight control system incorporated with innovative fenestration systems within the research project was tested and evaluated by several building simulation studies based on a representative floor plan of an university building modelled in SketchUp and simulated in TRNSYS. The objective for such a solution offers thermal, visual and non-visual comfort through an intelligent and energy-optimised interplay of daylight and artificial light. The outcomes of the study show a reduction of the total energy demand by 30% (with regard to heating, cooling and artificial light) as well as high potential for improved non-visual impact on the building occupants.

Digital version here